More Liberal Run Cities Enact Soda Tax

One of my first few blog posts when I started this site was about the city of Baltimore and their soda tax. In an attempt to balance the city budget, the city council passed a two cents per container tax on beverages. Pepsi’s response was to shut down production at the Baltimore plant, putting 75 people out of work. Grocery stores reported sales were down because nearby counties did not have the tax. I learned today that the tax increased to five cents per container in 2013.

Early last year the city of Philadelphia passed something similar, imposing a 1.5 cent-per-ounce tax on sweetened and diet beverages. The tax is imposed at the distributor level but any moron can tell you costs are always passed on to the consumer. The tax amounts to a $1.44 increase on a six-pack of 16 ounce bottles.

In March last year, Pepsi cited the tax when announcing 80 to 100 workers would be laid off at a distribution center serving Philadelphia.

So what effect did the tax have on Philadelphia businesses?

Philadelphia City […] → Keep reading

Baltimore: The Pratt Street Riot of 1861 and The Thug Riot of 2015

The rioting in Baltimore has been dominating the news this week and it has been a disgusting display of liberalism in action. The thugs claim victim status as justification for rioting, arson and theft while the police stand idly by, handcuffed by a wimp of a Mayor who wanted to give the “protesters” some “space to destroy” the city, while later claiming that she never said that. It is a stark contrast to the rioting in Baltimore in 1861 at the beginning of the Civil War. Fort Sumter, South Carolina is famous for being the location of the first shots fired in the war and the First Battle of Bull Run is famous for being the first major land battle of the armies in Virginia. But did you know that Baltimore is the location of the first documented casualty of the Civil War and that it happened during rioting in the streets? The Pratt Street Riot on April 19, 1861 was a violent event that took place on the streets of Baltimore and it involved some very different motivations from […] → Keep reading

Chicago: The Liberal Utopia

I read in the news yesterday that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is warning that he may double property taxes in Chicago to fund a $1.07 billion balloon payment on its $19.4 billion pension debt for city employees. The shortfall to the pensions comes to $7,100 per Chicago resident. The municipal workers, police, labour and firefighters’ pension funds are currently sitting at 33 percent funded, far below the 80 percent that is considered healthy, according to Financial Times. The Chicago teachers’ pension fund is also in trouble, currently sitting at 54 percent funded. Chicago’s city council is taking steps to deal with the financial crisis, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Wall Street Journal – Last month, Chicago’s city council approved the issuance of $500 million in commercial paper and $900 million in general-obligation bonds purportedly to refinance existing debt and improve public works. There’s little to stop politicians from pouring the proceeds into pensions – or later reneging on this unsecured debt if it were to file for bankruptcy.

The problems with Chicago’s finances seem to have spread to […] → Keep reading

Baltimore Tax Increase Costs 75 Their Jobs

The city council in Baltimore recently passed a two-cent per container tax on beverages, attempting to balance the city budget.

Pepsi has responded by shutting down production at the Baltimore plant, putting 75 people out of work.

Grocers have reported this month that sales are down in the city because nearby counties do not have the tax.

This is just a small example of what happens when governments raise taxes on businesses to make up for outrageous spending by the government. More harm is always the result.

More here: http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2011/01/10/baltimores-pepsi-plant-will-stop-making-soda/