Is Marrying A Computer Coming?

marriage_keyboardIf you think being allowed to marry a computer sounds ridiculous, so did same-sex marriage in the past. I never would have thought in my younger days that two men or two women would be legally allowed to get married. And not only that, failing to participate in the festivities could find you in legal hot water, sued out of business and up to your eyeballs in debt if you’re a florist or cake maker and opt to not put your stamp of approval on such an event.

We live in strange times. And it seems the times are on the cusp of getting even stranger.

A man named Chris Sevier is suing the state of Utah for the right to marry his laptop. The Utah Attorney General’s Office tried to have the lawsuit dismissed for a number of reasons, the main one being that a laptop cannot consent to marriage. But, a federal judge declined to dismiss the suit and allowed Sevier to amend his complaint.

Fox 13 Salt Lake – “For example, the Proposed Amended Complaint alleges Mr. Sevier married a machine in New Mexico, and the State of Utah refuses to recognize the marriage. Additionally, the Proposed Amended Complaint alleges Mr. Sevier sought a marriage license to marry the machine from Mr. Thompson, the Utah County Clerk, but the Clerk refused to issue the license,” she wrote.

Sevier also seeks to amend his lawsuit to include polygamy, bringing in additional plaintiffs and seeking to have Utah recognize their right to marriage.

Marrying a computer might sound familiar if you have ever seen the movie Bicentennial Man starring Robin Williams. It’s based on the 1992 Isaac Asimov novel The Positronic Man.

The novel tells of a robot named Andrew, who was constructed in human form. Over the course of two hundred years the robot begins to display human characteristics, learns socialization, advocates for its own self interests, replaces its own robotic components with synthetic organs and claims the process has made him human. Seeking to marry his original owner’s great-granddaughter, he cannot do so until a court will declare him to be human. The court rejects his request on the grounds that so long as he is immortal as an android, he cannot be human. Andrew then programs his positronic brain to begin aging and decaying, thus allowing himself to age. He again petitions the court and his request is eventually granted, allowing him to legally marry now that the court has declared him to be human.

Life is now imitating art.

Daily Herald – When asked if he was marrying his computer for love or to make a point, Sevier said in a phone interview that love doesn’t matter when it comes to marriage, because marriage’s main purpose is to provide a status of dignity.

“Imagine if you had to have a certain degree of love to get a marriage license?” he said. “How could you possibly measure that? But the position is, yeah, I love an inanimate object and want that object to be my spouse to the same extent a man wants to marry a man.”

The complaint outlines three “definitions” of marriage, including heterosexual marriage, homosexual marriage and marriage between an individual and who or whatever is their personal choice, “No matter how morally repugnant their request may seem.”

“No matter how morally repugnant their request may seem.”

We passed that barrier when homosexual marriage was given the stamp of court approval. Will marrying an inanimate object be next?

While I don’t see Sevier’s suit having any success this time, neither did the first suit seeking to legalize homosexual marriage. Eventually, I would not be surprised at all if a judge somewhere, someday says yes to Sevier or someone else seeking to marry a computer.

And don’t make the mistake of thinking this sick attraction people have to technology is confined to objects such as your Dell laptop, your Samsung smart phone or your Apple iPad.

In the complaint, Sevier identifies himself as a “machinist,” or someone who is sexually attracted to machines.

He stated in his court filing that his preference for sex with machines came about after viewing pornography.

“I was exposed to pornography on a filterless devices due to the lack of enforcement of obscenity laws over the Tech Enterprise,” Sevier wrote. “I became classically conditioned to prefer sex with an inanimate object as a result and now want to marry an inanimate object that is gender neutral.”

Sexual attraction to machines has actually born an industry that caters to that mental illness. If you haven’t read on sites like The Drudge Report about the advances in sex robots, this article here will shock you. It’s sickening the depravity that people are seeking to normalize.

I fail to see how one can get around the point made by the Utah Attorney General, that a computer is unable to give consent to marriage. But I also used to think that no court would be able to get around the fact that marriage is morally defined as one man and one woman. Somewhere out there is a judge who will concoct some reason why he believes a computer can give consent. Once that happens, the institution of marriage will be further annihilated. And ‘machinists’ will begin making demands that the government pay for their robots, their maintenance, upgrades, public charging stations, etc. After all, if marrying a computer is determined to be a right, the left believes that rights are to be fully funded and supplied by the government.

So perhaps at some point in our nation’s future, marriage as decreed by court order will be such that upgrading your workstation’s processor from an Intel Core i5 to an i7 will be a simple matter of filing for a marriage license and demanding the government pay for the upgrade. While I do hope that sounds completely ridiculous, so have a lot of things that have become ‘rights’ in this country. A sane person can dismiss the ridiculous but our courts have a long history of green lighting the ridiculous along with the depravity they force on us. People being allowed to marry a computer would just be more of what I’ve come to expect from the courts in our country.

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